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Frequently Asked Questions About Divorce

When you and your spouse are separating, there are dozens of questions that must be answered. Many people never put much thought into life after divorce, so it can be difficult to think about. The Law Firm of John & Morgan, P.C., is here to guide you in the right direction. We have worked with clients throughout Texas when they have needed it most. After reading through the list of frequently asked questions below, call our office in Houston to schedule a consultation at 713-369-5948 today. You can also fill out our contact form online.

How long does the divorce process take?

After you have filed, a divorce cannot be final for at least 60 days. After a judge signs off and pronounces it in open court, it is considered complete. The length of time depends on the complexity of your case. The more you agree on, the faster things may go. Our goal is to always solve things as efficiently as possible.

How will our property be divided?

We are a community property state. This means that anything acquired during the marriage is owned by both people and will be split how a judge determines fair. Separate property is anything that you had prior to your marriage and will remain yours. Things get tricky when people use their own assets during their time together. For example, maybe you bought your house and your spouse moved in. After living there together, they contributed to the mortgage for the last 10 years. Who gets the home? We can find solutions to these issues.

Will our community property be split 50/50?

Not necessarily. The court will look at a number of factors, including earning capacity between each spouse and who is at fault in the relationship. In some cases, they will split everything down the middle. In others, they may decide that what is “equal” and “fair” means one gets more than the other.